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L'ensauvagement du web - La Tribune.fr


La Tribune.fr

L'ensauvagement du web
La Tribune.fr
Loin le temps où des esprits enthousiastes pensaient que la technologie du world wide web avait vocation à servir les idéaux démocratiques, participatifs et autogestionnaires. On a vu, durant la décennie écoulée, combien les logiques mercantiles s'en ...

Avengers Infinity Wars : comment éviter les spoilers sur le web ... - Phonandroid


Phonandroid

Avengers Infinity Wars : comment éviter les spoilers sur le web ...
Phonandroid
Vous pouvez également arrêter de les suivre ce qui vous évitera sans doute quelques notifications malheureuses sur votre fil d'actualités… Pour Twitter en revanche, c'est beaucoup plus simple. Sur PC et Mac vous pouvez très facilement slalomer entre ...

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Alençon. Un web documentaire pour sensibiliser aux déchets - Ouest-France


Ouest-France

Alençon. Un web documentaire pour sensibiliser aux déchets
Ouest-France
Le web documentaire Sur le chemin de l'éco-citoyenneté, présenté mardi 24 avril, a été réalisé par les trois classes de sixième de l'établissement. Initiée en octobre, cette réalisation, qui entre dans le cadre de l'éducation aux médias et à l ...

Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ... - TVA Nouvelles


TVA Nouvelles

Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ...
TVA Nouvelles
Les autorités britanniques ont annoncé mercredi la fermeture d'un site internet à l'origine de plus de quatre millions d'attaques informatiques.

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Cyber Scorecarding Services

CircleID CircleID: Ample evidence exists to underline that shortcomings in a third-parties cybersecurity posture can have an extremely negative effect on the security integrity of the businesses they connect or partner with. Consequently, there's been a continuous and frustrated desire for a couple of decades for some kind of independent verification or scorecard mechanism that can help primary organizations validate and quantify the overall security posture of the businesses they must electronically engage with.

A couple of decades ago organizations could host a small clickable logo on their websites — often depicting a tick or permutation of a "trusted" logo — that would display some independent validation certificate detailing their trustworthiness. Obviously, such a system was open to abuse. For the last 5 or so years, the trustworthiness verification process has migrated ownership from the third-party to a first-party responsibility.

Today, there are a growing number of brand-spanking-new start-ups adding to pool of slightly longer-in-the-tooth companies taking on the mission of independently scoring the security and cyber integrity of organizations doing business over the Web.

The general premise of these companies is that they'll undertake a wide (and widening) range of passive and active probing techniques to map out a target organizations online assets, crawl associated sites and hidden crevasses (underground, over ground, wandering free… like the Wombles of Wimbledon?) to look for leaks and unintended disclosures, evaluate current security settings against recommended best practices, and even dig up social media dirt that could be useful to an attacker; all as contributors to a dynamic report and ultimate "scorecard" that is effectively sold to interested buyers or service subscribers.

I can appreciate the strong desire for first-party organizations to have this kind of scorecard on hand when making decisions on how best to trust a third-party supplier or partner, but I do question a number of aspects of the business model behind providing such security scorecards. And, as someone frequently asked by technology investors looking for guidance on the future of such business ventures, there are additional things to consider as well.

Are Cyber Scorecarding Services Worth it?

As I gather my thoughts on the business of cyber scorecarding and engage with the purveyors of such services again over the coming weeks (post RSA USA Conference), I'd offer up the following points as to why this technology may still have some business wrinkles and why I'm currently questioning the long-term value of the business model.

1. Lack of scoring standards

There is no standard to the scorecards on offer. Every vendor is vying to make their scoring mechanism the future of the security scorecard business. As vendors add new data sources or encounter new third-party services and configurations that could influence a score, they're effectively making things up as they go along. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, and ideally, the scoring will stabilize over time at a per vendor level, but we're still a long way away from having an international standard agreed to. Bear in mind, despite two decades of organizations such as OWASP, ISSA, SANS, etc., the industry doesn't yet have an agreed mechanism of scoring the overall security of a single web application, let alone the combined Internet presence of a global online business.

2. Heightened Public Cloud Security

Third-party organizations that have moved to the public cloud and have enabled the bulk of the default security features that are freely available to them and are using the automated security alerting and management tools provided, are already very secure — much more so that their previous on-premise DIY efforts. As more organizations move to the public cloud, they all begin to have the same security features, so why would a third-party scorecard be necessary? We're rapidly approaching a stage where just having an IP address in a major public cloud puts your organization ahead of the pack from a security perspective. Moreover, I anticipate that the default security of public cloud providers will continue to advance in ways that are not easily externally discernable (e.g., impossible travel protection against credential misuse) — and these kinds of ML/AI-led protection technologies may be more successful than the traditional network-based defense-in-depth strategies the industry has pursued for the last twenty-five years.

3. Score Representations

Not only is there no standard for scoring an organization's security, it's not clear what you're supposed to do with the scores that are provided. This isn't a problem unique to the scorecard industry — we've observed the phenomenon for CVSS scoring for 10+ years.

At what threshold should I be worried? Is a 7.3 acceptable, while a 7.6 means I must patch immediately? An organization with a score of 55 represents how much more of a risk to my business versus a vendor that scores 61?

The thresholds for action (or inaction) based upon a score are arbitrary and will be in conflict with each new advancement or input the scorecard provider includes as they evolve their service. Is the 88.8 of January the same as the 88.8 of May after the provider added new features that factored in CDN provider stability and Instagram crawling? Does this month's score of 78.4 represent a newly introduced weakness in the organization's security, or is the downgraded score an artifact of new insights that weren't accounted for previously by the score provider?

4. Historical References and Breaches

Then there's the question of how much of an organizations past should influence its future ability to conduct business more securely. If a business got hacked three years ago and the responsibly disclosed and managed their response — complete with reevaluating and improving their security, does another organization with the same current security configuration have a better score for not having disclosed a past breach?

Organizations get hacked all the time — it's why modern security now works on the premise of "assume breach." The remotely visible and attestable security of an organization provides no real insights into whether they are currently hacked or have been recently breached.

5. Gaming of Scorecards

Gaming of the scorecard systems is trivial and difficult to defend against. If I know who my competitors are and which scorecard provider (or providers) my target customer is relying upon, I can adversely affect their scores. A few faked "breached password lists" posted to PasteBin and underground sites, a handful of spam and phishing emails sent, a new domain name registration and craftily constructed website, a few subtle contributions to IP blacklists, etc. and their score is affected.

I haven't looked recently, but I wouldn't be surprised if some blackhat entrepreneurs haven't already launched such a service line. I'm sure it could pay quite well and requires little effort beyond the number of disinformation services that already exist underground. If scorecarding ever becomes valuable, so too will its deception.

6. Low Barrier to Market Entry

The barrier for entry into the scorecarding industry is incredibly low. Armed with "proprietary" techniques and "specialist" data sources, anyone can get started in the business. If for some reason third-party scorecarding becomes popular and financially lucrative, then I anticipate that any of the popular managed security services providers (MSSP) or automated vulnerability (VA) assessment providers could launch their competitive service with as little as a month's notice and only a couple of engineers.

At some point in the future, if there ever were to be standardization of scorecarding scores and evaluation criteria, that's when the large MSSP's and VA's would likely add such a service. The problem for the all the new start-ups and longer-toothed start-ups is that these MSSP's and VA's would have no need to acquire the technology or clientele.

7. Defending a Score

Defending the integrity and righteousness of your independent scoring mechanism is difficult and expensive. Practically all the scorecard providers I've met like to explain their efficacy of operation as if it were a credit bureau's Credit Score — as if that explains the ambiguities of how they score. I don't know all the data sources and calculations that credit bureaus use in their credit rating systems, but I'm pretty sure they're not port scanning websites, scraping IP blacklists, and enumerating service banners — and that the people being scored have as much control to modify the data that the scoring system relies upon.

My key point here though lies with the repercussions of getting the score wrong or providing a score that adversely affects an organization to conduct business online — regardless of the scores righteousness. The affected business will question and request the score provider to "fix their mistake" and to seek compensation for the damage incurred. In many ways it doesn't matter whether the scorecard provider is right or wrong — costs are incurred defending each case (in energy expended, financial resources, lost time, and lost reputation). For cases that eventually make it to court, I think the "look at the financial credit bureau's" defense will fall a little flat.

Final Thoughts

The industry strongly wants a scoring mechanism to help distinguish good from bad, and to help prioritize security responses at all levels. If only it were that simple, it would have been solved quite some time ago.

Organizations are still trying to make red/amber/green tagging work for threat severity, business risk, and response prioritization. Every security product tasked with uncovering or collating vulnerabilities, misconfigurations, aggregating logs and alerts, or monitoring for anomalies, is equally capable of (and likely is) producing their own scores.

Providing a score isn't a problem in the security world, the problem lies in knowing how to respond to the score you've been presented with!
Written by Gunter Ollmann, CTO, Security (Cloud and Enterprise) at MicrosoftFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cybersecurity

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«Ça devient gênant votre romance»: quand le Web ironise sur les ... - Sputnik France


Sputnik France

«Ça devient gênant votre romance»: quand le Web ironise sur les ...
Sputnik France
Alors qu'Emmanuel Macron et Donald Trump ne cessent de toucher le public en montrant au monde entier que deux Présidents peuvent aimer se faire des accolades, se tenir par la main, s'exercer au jardinage et même s'occuper des pellicules de l'autre, les ...

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Forget Your “Job.” Define Your “Calling”

The Frager Factor The Frager Factor:  Today: Content Marketing, Apple, B1B Buyers, Mess In Miami, Leads, Self-Improvement

Four Sure-Fire Ways to Motivate Your People, And Dinner With You Isn't One of Them

5 Realities Sales Should Know About Modern B2B Buyers

Modern B2B buying behaviors require sales leaders to understand how customers make purchases and how sales can influence the decision-making process.

The post Forget Your “Job.” Define Your “Calling” appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.

Writing website copy is all about planning and purpose

I Want My Name I Want My Name:
Beyond the challenge of actually building a website (it’s really easy these days), the biggest hangup I see by far is writing the content. And I get it — writing is hard. But unlike the magic that goes into web design or development, writing is something you’ve been doing since grade school. Nearly everyone can write. You can write.
I don’t want this to be a writing lesson though. Instead, what most people need is a better way to think about how people consume content on the web. And I’ll get to the point — most people start here:

What do I need to say to get people to like me?

When they should start here:

What, exactly, are people supposed to do here?

To clarify what that means, let’s pretend you’re a financial planner looking to start a website. Instead of diving in with the equivalent of a LinkedIn profile (I see this all too often), what you should be doing is creating a pathway for people to go from random visitor to customer.
Step one, before you put a single word on a page, is to identify the action you want people to take. Is your goal to have people call you? Email you? Register for something? Sign up for a newsletter?
Once you’ve identified that desired action, step two is to think of yourself as a customer. What sorts of information would you need to get you to perform that action in a single page? A long bio and some boring supporting content wouldn’t sell you, would it? There are a million financial planners out there, all generally offering the same thing — what you need is for your specific problem to be identified and solved. Or even better, what you need is for a problem to be identified for you, with a solution in plain view.

Headline: Saving for retirement is great, but that IRA isn’t going to buy you a beach house.

Subhead: I believe in retirements with a view.

Button: Call me.

See, any financial planner will help you plan for retirement, but a statement like that makes something mostly-automated like an IRA seem inadequate… because who doesn’t want to retire with a beach house? We’ve all see the beachfront property show on HGTV. We know it’s not out of reach — we just need some help. And that’s where you come in. Using X, Y, Z, you can get anyone a beach house. But you have to start saving now. Like, today. Call me.
Get it?
If you want something tangible to look at, I think Wealthfront nails it. Here’s their homepage:

Headline: Live the life you want. We’ve got your back.

Copy: Imagine being confident about the financial decisions you make. Sounds crazy, we know.

Then they have a brilliantly laid out section further down (the entire page is made of easily digestible content — no long paragraphs or endless lists):

Headline: Our investment strategies may be sophisticated, but our philosophy is simple.

Bucket 1: reduce risk - We’ll build you a diversified portfolio that aims to maximize returns without taking you out of your risk comfort zone. And our software automatically maintains the right level of diversification for you.

Bucket 2: reduce taxes - We built tax intelligence into our software to help lower the taxes you pay, so you’ll have more money to invest.

Bucker 3: reduce fees - We don’t let higher fees eat away at your long-term returns. Our fees are simple and low, and our goal is to keep offering more value without raising costs.

But what’s best about Wealthfront’s website is that nearly every page ends with a call to action (CTA). And they do it so effortlessly:

Headline: It all sounds very sophisticated, because it is. But for you, it’s effortless.

Subhead: Wealthfront is complexity, simplified.

Button: Put us to work

Their secret sauce — aside from having a good content team — is that they know exactly what they want people to do.
So if step two in this content writing process was to quickly define the reason for your existence, step three is to reinforce it.
If you help people save for college, what makes you unique? Why should they put their trust in you? Buying a house? What makes you so special? Obviously, your primary focus should live on your homepage, but don’t be afraid to create individual pages to reinforce more specific funnels. And always remember that each of these pages should be able to stand on its own. That means each page needs to:

Be concise - Get to the point, and be compelling.

Deliver the goods - If someone gets to the bottom of the page without a clear view of what makes you special, they’re probably not going to convert.

Have a CTA - Convert, convert, convert. If someone gets to the bottom of a page and doesn’t know what the next step is, you’ve failed. (And by next step, I mean the next step in the sales funnel — coffee is for closers.)

Assuming you’ve clearly carved out your place in the world, all you have to do now is fill in the gaps. Do you feel like some potential clients will need content on your methodology? Make a page for that, but understand that most people aren’t going to dig that deep. If you have a secondary site navigation, put it there. Same with a blog or a newsletter — if your brand would benefit from “thought leadership” and you’re committed to maintaining a regular stream of content, go for it.
The most important thing is to nail basics though. Don’t forget the basics:

Identify the action you want customers to take.

Quickly define the reason for your existence, then ask people to perform that action.

Reinforce your offering. If people don’t know you offer a service or do something unique, it’s like a tree falling in a forest. No one will hear about it.

The post Writing website copy is all about planning and purpose appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.

Jolly.com is Subject of UDRP

Domain Investing Domain Investing: A UDRP was filed at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) for the Jolly.com domain name. The case ID is WIPO Case D2018-0924. Jolly.com is a descriptive domain name that was registered over 20 years ago in 1997. The domain name is registered under Whois privacy at GoDaddy. If you visit the domain name, you can see the standard “Future home of something quite cool” coming soon landing page that is provided by the domain registrar. I do not see any monetization on the landing page. Prior to the domain name going under Whois privacy in 2008, the domain name → Read More

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Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ... - TVA Nouvelles


TVA Nouvelles

Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ...
TVA Nouvelles
Les autorités britanniques ont annoncé mercredi la fermeture d'un site internet à l'origine de plus de quatre millions d'attaques informatiques.

et plus encore »

Le chat le plus maladroit au monde devient le chouchou du Web ... - Sputnik France


Sputnik France

Le chat le plus maladroit au monde devient le chouchou du Web ...
Sputnik France
Un chaton maladroit marche sur un ordinateur portable et tombe à la renverse en emportant celui-ci. Cette scène aussi mignonne qu'amusante est devenue une des vidéos préférées des internautes qui ne peuvent pas s'empêcher d'en rire et de faire des GIF ...

Ces jeunes femmes marocaines prennent la parole sur le web - Les Échos


Les Échos

Ces jeunes femmes marocaines prennent la parole sur le web
Les Échos
Conformément à la loi Informatique et Liberté n° 78-17 du 6 janvier 1978 relative à l'informatique, aux fichiers et aux libertés, nous nous engageons à informer les personnes qui fournissent des données nominatives sur notre site de leurs droits ...

21.com to Become a Casino

Domain Investing Domain Investing: It looks like the high value 21.com domain name is going to become a casino. I noticed a change (via DomainTools) yesterday when the domain name transferred registrars from eNom to SafeNames. When I visited 21.com, I saw a coming soon landing page announcing plans for the domain name and website: From what I can see, the domain name appears to have been registered privately at Enom. I am unsure if the domain name was recently acquired or had been held by the same registrant under privacy. I reached out to the domain registrant to ask for a comment about → Read More

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AUCTION RECAP OF APRIL 24, 2018

Domain Shane Domain Shane: A comprehensive look at the final auction prices, closeouts and more from the auction list posted on April 24, 2018.
If there is an asterisk (*) next to a price, it means that the name was at auction from a private seller (rather than an expiring name) and may have had a reserve.  I’m only showing where the price was when the auction ended, but the name may not have sold if a reserve was in place.
 
Namejet Names at Auction
genomes.com $4,300
vusu.com $2,522
tinley.com $1,620
freebees.com $1,300
mqp.net $1,105
up.biz.com $830
92030.com $820
terraalta.com $819
60503.com $800
80939.com $800
The post AUCTION RECAP OF APRIL 24, 2018 appeared first on DSAD.

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April 22, 1993 – A Day The Internet Fundamentally Changed

CircleID CircleID: 25 years ago, on April 22, 1993, a software release happened that fundamentally changed the user experience of the Internet. On that day, version 1.0 of "NCSA Mosaic for the X Window System" was released. You could now have (gasp!) text MIXED WITH IMAGES on the same page!

Reading the Mosaic 1.0 release notes from Marc Andreessen is a bit of fun, as it includes gems like "Fixed mysterious stupid coredump that only hits Suns.” and " Obscure infinite loop triggered by extra space in IMG tag fixed.” It brings us back to a different era when the number of computing platforms was much smaller, as was the community of Internet users.

Marc, of course, would go on to co-found Netscape which would bring many improvements to the user experience, perhaps most notably the progressive loading of images. Unlike Mosaic, we suddenly no longer had to wait for everything to be downloaded to see the page displayed!

But all that was still to come. Back in April 1993, we were just delighted to be experimenting with this new Mosaic and this "World Wide Web" thing.

You must remember that at that time the Internet was primarily a text-based medium. Email was the major communication method. "Publishing", such that it was, took place on menu-based gopher servers (with veronica for search), or by placing files on FTP servers (with archie for search), or by posting text into various USENET groups. Even this small new service known as the "World Wide Web" was all text.

Sure, you could download/view images, but to do so, you chose a link or a menu item or a filename. And you got the one image or movie or whatever.

Mosaic allowed us to display both images and text mixed together. The images were "inline", as we would say. Wired published a good piece back in April 2010 that provides some perspective about how much this changed.

And suddenly so many of us wanted to publish our own web pages with our own images!

As if this weren't enough, Mosaic also did something else remarkable - it gave us one user client that could connect to many different Internet services. From within Mosaic, you could connect out to all the other existing services. As stated in the 1.0 release notes:

NCSA Mosaic provides a consistent and easy-to-use hypermedia-based interface into a wide variety of networked information sources, including Gopher, WAIS, World Wide Web, NNTP/Usenet news, Techinfo, FTP, local filesystems, Archie, finger, Hyper-G, HyTelnet, TeXinfo, telnet, tn3270, and more.

(Remember all those?) Sure, the ftp experience in Mosaic might not have been as good as a dedicated FTP client, but it was "good enough" for many people.

I doubt many of us (myself included) had any clue how much our world would change. Mosaic would put a "face" on the Internet for so many new users. It made the alphabet soup of existing command-line tools so much easier and accessible to non-techie users. And it ushered in the rise of Web from this small experimental service on the Internet ... to becoming the dominant way in which we interact with content across the Internet. It opened the door to what would become millions and then billions of people communicating, connecting, coordinating, collaborating and creating. And, of course, commerce. And it started the idea of the "web browser" being the one tool you could use to access all services.

But back in April 1993, all those of us on UNIX platforms knew was that this Mosaic thing many of us had been playing with in beta form for a few months was now available as "1.0". The Windows and Mac versions would come later that year. It was fun. It was cool.

And it would forever change the way users interact with services on the Internet.
Written by Dan York, Author and Speaker on Internet technologies - and on staff of Internet SocietyFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Web

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« Le Web a développé des résistances antibiotiques à la démocratie » - Le Monde


Le Monde

« Le Web a développé des résistances antibiotiques à la démocratie »
Le Monde
Dans un discours engagé à la prestigieuse Web Conference, la plus ancienne conférence des chercheurs et professionnels du secteur qui se déroule cette année à Lyon (Rhône), Luciano Floridi, professeur de philosophie et d'éthique de l'information à l ...

Privacy advocates want Whois private by default. It shouldn’t be.

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: Like many other public databases, Whois serves a vital public interest. It shouldn’t be private by default. It’s becoming increasingly clear that privacy advocates are using GDPR as an opportunity to demand privacy for all domain name registrants. They are successfully framing the discussion as privacy should be the expectation of everyone, and any exception […]
© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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L'OPINION DU WEB - Etes-vous prêt à investir dans le ... - Midi Libre


Midi Libre

L'OPINION DU WEB - Etes-vous prêt à investir dans le ...
Midi Libre
L 'Etat va procéder à un appel d'offres de 300 mégawatts pour des installations photovoltaïques dans le Haut-Rhin où la centrale nucléaire de Fessenheim va fermer. Et vous, êtes-vous prêt, à titre personnel, à investir dans cette source d'énergie plus ...

L' Agence Web - Emarketing


L' Agence Web
Emarketing
Apprenez tout ce que vous devez savoir sur le Règlement Général Protection données (RGPD) de 2018 grâce à l'expertise de l'Agence-Web. Agence [...] 24 avr. 2018. L'Agence Web, est une agence de marketing digital spécialisée sur le levier d'acquisition ...

CV.com Is Returned to Its Rightful Owner

NamePros NamePros: With just 676 domains in existence, two-letter .COM names are some of the most sought-after properties on the Internet. Thanks largely to interest from Chinese investors, these names now routinely fetch six and seven-figure prices. Two-letter names are liquid domains that can easily be resold within a matter of days thanks to the number of investors around the World who covet these as assets. It's this liquidity that can make these a target for domain thieves.

Last week, we noticed that the...

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Credit bureaus go after more AnnualCreditReport.com typosquatters

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: Company says that domains are typos of its AnnualCreditReport.com site. Central Source, a company created by the three major U.S. consumer credit bureaus to AnnualCreditReport.com, has filed another lawsuit (pdf) against alleged typosquatting domain names. The company has filed at least 10 cases in the past including one against 227 domain names. The latest suit […]
© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Daily Poll: Do You Own Hyphenated Domain Names?

Domain Investing Domain Investing: In some countries, it seems like hyphenated domain names are more commonly seen and/or acceptable than here in the US. I occasionally see hyphenated domain names in use here, but it is not a regular occurrence. Because of this, I don’t recall owning hyphenated domain names. There are investors who have no issues with owning hyphenated domain names. I am sure there have been some domain names with hyphens that have sold for solid amounts, too. With the limited usage and demand here in the US, I don’t even know if I would buy a great two word hyphenated .com → Read More

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De la TV au panier web, le chemin du TV-naute par Admo.tv - viuz


viuz

De la TV au panier web, le chemin du TV-naute par Admo.tv
viuz
C'est un fait, la diffusion d'un spot TV engendre systématiquement des perturbations sur le trafic d'un annonceur. Cet impact dit Drive-to-Web implique que la TV doit être pris en compte dans le funnel d'acquisition comme n'importe quel autre point de ...

Une charte pour les plates-formes d'architecture sur le web - Moniteur


Moniteur

Une charte pour les plates-formes d'architecture sur le web
Moniteur
Garantir la protection du titre d'architecte, promouvoir des pratiques vertueuses, éviter les confusions… Pas toujours facile d'y voir clair sur le web face à la prolifération de plates-formes qui référencent les services d'architectes en les mettant ...

Comment repenser son site web pour qu'il convertisse - PAPERJAM


PAPERJAM

Comment repenser son site web pour qu'il convertisse
PAPERJAM
Comment un site web peut-il être optimisé pour les conversions ? Dans une démarche Inbound Marketing qui a pour but de faire venir vos clients jusqu'à vous plutôt que d'aller vers eux, votre mission est de créer un site web qui soit capable d'attirer ...

Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ... - Le Point


Le Point

Fermeture d'un site web responsable de 4 millions d'attaques ...
Le Point
Les autorités britanniques ont annoncé mercredi la fermeture d'un site internet à l'origine de plus de quatre millions d'attaques informatiques dans le monde dans le cadre d'une opération internationale ayant mené à plusieurs arrestations. "Des pirates ...

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